Law courses in English - full list

Please note : incoming exchange students at the Department of Law are required to complete the International and EU Law - Self-assessment Test that can be found at the following link: https://goo.gl/forms/rbuR62cFWAmC3U2L2 . Those who score less than 22/30 on this test are strongly encouraged to attend either the intensive course on Introduction to International and EU Law (17 September-4 October 2019) or the intensive course on Introduction to EU Law (3-21 February 2020) prior to any of the advanced courses in English (marked with the symbol *).

First Semester

Advanced Legal Clinic

40 hours | 6 ECTS | 70616

Serena Forlati

International Labour Law* - a.a. 19/20 - Seminar

40 hours | 3+3 ECTS credits

Gianni Rosas and Ambra Migliore

International Trade Law * - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55538

Magdalena Elisabeth de Leeuw

Introduction to International and EU Law (pre-semester intensive course) - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 62339

Serena Forlati

Private International Law * - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 52860

Pietro Franzina

Intellectual Property Infringement and Organized Crime - a.a. 19/20 - Seminar

20 hours | 3 ECTS credits

Michael Blakeney

 

Second Semester

European Company Law * - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55539

Magdalena Elisabeth de Leeuw

European Criminal Law - a.a 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55542

Ciro Grandi

European Labour Law * - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55541

Silvia Borelli

International Human Rights * - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 44236

Alessandra Annoni

International Taxation Law * - a.a 19/20

Marco Greggi 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55540

Marco Greggi

Introduction to EU Law - a.a- 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 62340

Jacopo Alberti

Transitional justice - a.a. 19/20

40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 69856

Werle Gerhard Helmut

First Semester

 

Introduction to International and EU Law (pre-semester intensive course)

Serena Forlati 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 62339

The first part of the course will provide an introduction to Public International Law, focusing on: (i) the structure and general features of the international legal order; (ii) international legal personality: subjects and “actors” in the international legal order; (iii) the sources of International Law; (iv) the relationship between International Law and Domestic Law; (v) the responsibility for internationally wrongful acts; (vi) the settlement of international disputes. The second part of the course will deal with the law of the European Union, focusing on: (i) the history of the EU; (ii) the institutional framework; (iii) the sources of EU Law; (iv) the competences of the EU; (v) EU Law and Domestic Law; (vi) the Court of Justice of the European Union.

Attendance to the course is highly recommended to incoming exchange students who would like to follow semester courses in the fields of International and European Law but lack sufficient knowledge in those areas.

 

International Trade Law *

Magdalena Elisabeth de Leeuw 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55538

The first and main part of the course will deal with cross-border private transactions, focusing on the international sales of goods and on the various relations that arise as a result of a sale contract. Topics include among others the UN Convention on the International Sales of Goods 1980 and the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts; INCOTERMS 2010 (standard trade terms); International transportation of cargo by sea and road, including the Hague-Visby Rules and Rotterdam Rules and the Convention on the International Carriage of Goods by Road (‘CMR’). Insurance of goods during their transit from the exporting to the importing country is an important aspect of an international sales transaction. The focus of the discussion is on marine insurance contracts, since much of the cargo is still done by sea. Attention shall furthermore be paid to dispute resolution, the applicable law, arbitration and mediation.

The second part of the course will address the regulatory relationship between State actors and traders, analysing in particular the rules laid down in WTO agreements, with regard, inter alia, to tariffs and duties, subsidies and countervailing measures. At the end of the course students will have a clear overview of the complexities of an international sale transaction through the analysis of international conventions and rules, legislation and case law.

Class schedule:

Tuesday: 11.00 am - 1.00 pm

Thursday: 11.00 am - 1.00 pm

(every week from October 8th)

 

Private International Law *

Pietro Franzina 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 52860

Legal relationships within the area of private law often feature connections with two or more countries, thereby displaying an international character. Private international law deals with those cases. Its rules address the challenges posed by legal diversity, with the aim to provide certainty and ensure the cross-border continuity of the rights of those involved. The course examines a selection of private international law instruments. The focus is on the rules enacted by the EU as regards contracts, torts, divorce and parental responsibility. Topics include: (i) the object and function of private international law; (ii) adjudicatory jurisdiction; (iii) the law applicable to cross-border legal relationships; (iv) recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments; and (v) international judicial assistance.

Class schedule:

Thursday: 9.00 am - 11.00 am

Friday: 9.00 am - 11.00 1m

(every week from October 17th)

 

Intellectual Property Infringement and Organized Crime (Seminar)

Michael Blakeney 20 hours | 3 ECTS credits

This course covers the following topics: 1. The metrics of the international trade in infringing goods and services; 2. Intellectual property crime and public order – organized crime and terrorism; 3. Policy responses to the involvement of organised criminals in intellectual property crime; 4. International legislation and intellectual property crime; 5. EU legislation and intellectual property crime- customs controls; 6. National confiscation legislation and intellectual property crime – USA, UK, Italy, France; 7. Case studies in intellectual property crime – medicines, food and agricultural chemicals; 8. Case studies in intellectual property crime – fashion products; 9. Case studies in intellectual property crime – digital products-music, movies and computer programs; 10. The social origins of intellectual property crime.

 

Class schedule:

October 22nd: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

October 23rd: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

October 24th: 4.00 pm – 6.00 pm

October 29th: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

October 30th: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

October 31st: 4.00 pm – 6.00 pm

November 5th: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

November 6th: 9.00 am – 11.00 am

November 7th: 4.00 pm – 6.00 pm

November 14th: 4.00 pm – 6.00 pm

November 18th: 9.00 am – 11.00 am


International Labour Law* (Seminar)

Gianni Rosas and Ambra Migliore

The course aims at providing knowledge about the International Labour Organisation and its functioning. In the first part of the course, the origin and the history of ILO that, in 2019 celebrates its centenary, are illustrated. Moreover, the ILO tripartite composition is explain, describing the different bodies that operate inside the Organisation. Besides, the rules that regulate the ILO Committees aimed at enforcing ILO Conventions and Recommendations are presented.

The second part of the course focuses on what ILO does to improve labour standards and working conditions. Therefore, the main ILO Conventions and Recommendations are examined, taking also into consideration how they have been implemented at national level. Some cases of infringements and violations detected by the ILO Committees are illustrated. In the final part of the course, the effectiveness of ILO regulation at national level is analysed, exploring if and how national courts apply ILO Conventions and Regulations and their juridical value in the national legal orders. Moreover, the relevance of ILO regulation for other International entities (as the EU Institutions, the European Court of Human Rights and the European Committee for social rights) is explored.

Participants in the first part of the course will earn 3 ECTS, as well as participants to the second part of the course.

In 2019 the course will be taught by two ILO fonctionnaires that can present their deep knowledge of the Organisation.

 

Class schedule:

 

(dott. GIANNI ROSAS)

December 3th: 3.00 pm - 7.00 pm (room 7);

December 4th: 10.00 am - 1.00 pm (room 7) and 4.00 pm - 7.00 pm (room 6);

December 5th: FINAL SEMINAR (exercise and practice): 9.00 am - 1.00 pm (room 8):

 

(dott.ssa AMBRA MIGLIORE)

December 9th: 9.00 am - 1.00 pm (room 2) and 3.00 pm - 5.00 pm (room 2);

December 10th: 9.00 am - 1.00 pm (room 2) and 3.00 pm - 5.00 pm (room 3);

December 11th: 9.00 am - 1.00 pm (room 7);

December 12th: FINAL SEMINAR (exercise and practice): 9.00 am - 2.00 pm (room 8);

December 13th: FINAL SEMINAR (exercise and practice): 9.00 am - 2.00 pm (room 8).

 

Web page: link

 

Second Semester


European Company Law *

Magdalena Elisabeth de Leeuw 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55539

The course aims to provide students with a detailed knowledge of the legal measures adopted in this field of law by the European institutions. As an introduction, attention shall be paid to the general characteristics of business organisations (e.g. partnerships, public companies and private companies) and the main differences between those organisations in Europe.

The following issues will then be examined: (i) the case-law of the Court of Justice on the right of establishment for companies and legal entities; (ii) the EU’s harmonisation programme, with a discussion of the relevant directives (on disclosure, capital, mergers, cross-border mergers, annual accounts etc.); and (iii) the creation of EU business organisations including the European Company and the European Cooperative Society. The course will also place specific emphasis on current issues such as corporate mobility for national companies and the development of groups of companies.

 

 

European Criminal Law

Ciro Grandi 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55542

The first part of the course will address the impact of the European Convention on Human Rights on national criminal laws, with a focus on the prohibition of torture and inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment (art. 3 ECHR) and on the principle of legality (art. 7 ECHR). The second part of the course will address the development of a European criminal policy and the interplays between EU law and national criminal law, with a focus on: (i) the lack of competence in criminal matters of European institutions under the founding Treaties; (ii) the harmonization of sanctions in the European legal system; (iii) the European administrative sanctions; (iv) the EU third pillar under the Treaties of Maastricht and Amsterdam; (iv) the Area of Freedom Security and Justice under the Treaty of Lisbon; (v) the European Arrest Warrant; (iv) the role of fundamental rights in EU criminal law.

 

European Labour Law *

Silvia Borelli 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55541

 

The course aims at providing knowledge about labour law issues in the European integration process. In the first part of the course, the social rules of the EU Treaties and the EU social policies are presented. The origin and the evolution of the European social dialogue and the European and transnational collective bargaining are as well illustrated. The second part of the course deals with the harmonisation of national labour regulations or transnational labour law.

During each academic year, the course deepens one of the two topics. The  harmonisation of national labour law focuses on: health and safety at work; working time regulations; antidiscrimination law; non-standard workers; redundancies; transfer of undertaking; employer’s insolvency; right to information and consultation. Transnational labour law focuses on: free movement of citizens and workers; freedom of establishment and freedom to provide services and their effects on labour law (posting of workers, limits to the right to strike, the application of collective agreements); transnational collective agreements; right to information and participation in European undertakings and groups of undertakings.

During the lessons, the main ECJ, ECtHR and ECSR decisions are discussed and some European and transnational collective agreements are analysed.

 

International Human Rights *

Annoni Alessandra 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 44236

The institutional part of the course will address the general framework of human rights protection in international law: (i) the multilevel protection of human beings in international law; the history of human rights and the role of the individual in the international legal system; (ii) the sources of international human rights law; (iii) the contents of human rights rules, with special reference to civil rights; (iv) the international responsibility for violations of human rights rules; (v) monitoring compliance with international human rights obligations: the role of diplomatic protection; UN Charter-based and treaty-based bodies; judicial enforcement, especially in the European system; criminal prosecution of human rights violations; civil suits against human rights violations; and (vi) the effects of human rights treaties in the Italian legal order.

The second part of the course will focus on the relationship between the fight against organised crime and the protection of fundamental human rights. The latter topic will also be addressed in the context of inter-disciplinary seminars organised by Ma.Cr.O. - Inter-Disciplinary Research Centre on Mafia and other forms of Organised Crime

 

 

International Taxation Law *

Marco Greggi 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 55540

The course is divided into two parts. The first part addresses the main theoretical aspects of international taxation, including the legitimation to tax by a sovereign State, the (possible) self-restraint in the exercise of this power in order to prevent international double taxation, the source and residence rules applicable to cross-border situations. The second part focuses on the OECD and UN Model Conventions. These will be analysed following an article-by-article approach, with emphasis on specific provisions, such as those relating to the concept of permanent establishment, the residence (and domicile) for tax purposes and the notion of passive income.

In this respect, the course will also deal with the ways and means to prevent double taxation, including the use of tax credit or the exemption mechanism. Eventually, basic tax planning schemes will be introduced to students, using the Italian legal system as a benchmark to assess their feasibility and the possible advantages determined by their actual implementation. This will lead to the addressing of tax avoidance and evasion issues together with the principle of “abuse of law” which is extensively used by the Italian and European judiciary to solve intricate cases of tax avoidance.

 

 

Introduction to EU Law (pre-semester intensive course)

Jacopo Alberti 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 62340

The course gives students an insight into the law of the European Union. The European Union is an international organisation (sui-generis) with its own legal order, which is separate from International Law and forms an integral part of the legal systems of the Member States. To fully understand its specific characteristics, it is necessary to look first briefly at the basic features of Public International Law; e.g. subjects, sources and the relationship between international law and national law.[1] [2]

The course is divided into two parts. The constitutional and institutional part address the following topics: (i) the creation and development of the EU; (ii) its institutional structure and functioning; (iii) competences; (iv) decision- making; (v) the sources of EU law; (vi) direct effect and supremacy; (vii) the judicial system and enforcement of EU law.

The substantive part of the course analyses in particular the internal market and harmonisation, the four fundamental freedoms and the area of freedom, security and justice. The analysis of the relevant case law of the European Court of Justice is an intrinsic part of the course. The course aims at meeting the needs of incoming exchange students that would like to follow courses in the fields of International and European law but lack sufficient knowledge in those areas.

 

Transitional Justice

Werle Gerhard Helmut 40 hours | 6 ECTS credits | 69856

The lecture will provide an overview of fundamental principles of international criminal justice, with a focus on transitional justice. It will deal with the historical evolution of international criminal law, the core crimes, such as genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression, and the general principles of individual criminal responsibility under international law. Current international case law will be covered throughout just as the various modes of enforcement, including prosecution of international crimes before national courts.